Christian Comic Arts Society

A Network of Christian Fellowship for Comics Fans, Pros, and Amateurs

Vampires & Werewolves, can we tell a Christian-oriented GOOD story with such themes?

I've been thinking this over for some time, my husband has been writing a werewolf story for a while now, oriented it towards a graphic novel, the plot is AWESOME (imo- being his wife aside-and I'm pretty picky on plots).

Now, though the idea of vampires/werewolves are a sticky subject due to their references to curses, demons, etc can a good story that involves such themes that are popular to the modern culture (maybe not just the modern but you get the idea- though no sparkly vamps in this...it's just wrong!) can be created in a way to show Christian tones much in the way of Lord of the Rings, or The Hobbit does? Or is this considered "compromising" ? Which is one of the many things I do NOT want to do with the talent God has graced me with.

A woman once told me "oh good, christian comics shouldn't have violence in them", see, I like some blood and gore here and there (there is a point of excessive use, however) and some explosions, fights, good ol get down drag outs knuckle busters, but yet whenever it comes to "christian" comics, it seems we're "not supposed to do that".

Well, sometimes that's everyday life in the world, fights, disagreements, etc, depending on your plot and genre of course, but it seems even us as Christians think that comics are supposed to be all smiles, sunshine, roses and lollipops!...and that's where we get corny stories that bore people to tears (imo).

My pastor always says if you can't find it in the Bible to back it up, don't do it. Since the Bible is Gods Word and all manner of instruction (as we know) is in there, besides prayer over the subject.

I honestly feel like I'm in the box with my creativity due to this, if I know I can create something awesome and not just mediocre and still give God praise through it, I'll hit the roof with joy!

Your thoughts?

Views: 849

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I have done some research on werewolves and the myth of them, seems they go back to the era of witchcraft and shape shifters. I'm Cherokee (60%) and know about "skinwalkers" from legends, which are were-creatures or shamans who change into animals, etc. Now, the Bible talks about not emulating or even being Witches or in witchcraft, sorcerers, etc...would creating such a story be emulating this then?

As I see it, using vampires, or I guess werewolves, in a story isn't a bad thing if they're used as villains, as monsters. The problem I have is when I see vampires glorified in fiction... like with THE VAMPIRE DIARIES or TWILIGHT.

 

I'm using Count Orlok (from NOSFERATU) in AN ACT OF FAITH. One of the themes in the story is that vampires are bad. Vampires are walking dead things that want to eat you. (I say this all of the time) Vampires should not be cute guys that all of the young girls want to make smoochies with.  

I agree, vamps are bad and should stay that way and vampires should never "sparkle"... *shudder* >.<, but again, this isn't just on vampires, what about the werewolves if one werewolf is a good guy that (eventually) is cured of his lycanthrope that he was born with (taking the born in sin as that and salvation as the cure, I assume is my hubby's goal)?

while I try to avoid subjects like vampires and werewolves i do believe they can be used in a symbolic way to give a spiritual message.For example you could have a vampire who struggles against his desire for human blood as a symbolic representation of the spiritual battle between the old and new nature of a christian. of course they do make good villains representing satan and his evil forces these are just a few ideas

Personally, I don't see a problem with using vampires or werewolves or even zombies allegorically (not particularly my preferred genre, but I don't have a problem with them really). Monsters in secular fiction tend to represent aspects of human nature or the human condition, so why not just put a Christian spin on it? I see it as more about the portrayal than the archetype. Mermaids have ties to pagan legends and even the occult, but I wouldn't exactly call Ariel a tool of Satan.

Though the undead are traditionally associated with the occult, lust, and numerous other taboos in Christianity, as you've said there's the potential to draw parallels between the lifting of a monster's curse and the spiritual transformation that comes about when one is born again. This might work especially well for vampires as it's easier to make the connection between a dead character and a dead or not-yet-quickened spirit. And personally, I don't see why they would necessarily have to be the villain. Though darker, the allegory could work the other way, portraying the vampire in a way that exemplifies being dead to sin and having new life in Christ (i.e. maybe the flaws of his human side are in fact the problem, like the flesh, and what he's turning into more closely models the spiritual man). If it's merely the occult element of it all that's the issue, then there is of course an easy work-around: just take a page from Marvel's Morbius: The Living Vampire or virtually every zombie franchise that's out there, changing the origin of the character's affliction from the supernatural (a curse, a potion) to science fiction (a viral or bacterial plague, being taken over by an alien organism).

Those are just my thoughts. Hope they're of some value!

Thanks, that's the general idea of what I think the story is evolving towards.

Paul Philpott JR said:

while I try to avoid subjects like vampires and werewolves i do believe they can be used in a symbolic way to give a spiritual message.For example you could have a vampire who struggles against his desire for human blood as a symbolic representation of the spiritual battle between the old and new nature of a christian. of course they do make good villains representing satan and his evil forces these are just a few ideas

Amber, Thanks so much, you really put a new perspective on it. I have asked God about it, but I think my main problem is that I want to do a few other types of comics whereas God is orienting me towards this one in particular to which I think the "simpler" style is what I'm fighting against in the flesh, so thanks for that, I know we all wrestle from time to time, but what I think would be just the "greatest thing" to do for comics seems to be what God is saying.. "not right now." and in which much of the way a child would do, I feel pouty about it.

Amber Parker said:

"I honestly feel like I'm in the box with my creativity due to this, if I know I can create something awesome and not just mediocre and still give God praise through it, I'll hit the roof with joy!"

The best thing you can do as a Christian artist is to follow the leading and guiding of the Holy Spirit.  God is INIFINITELY creative, following His direction will lead you to creative and effective work.  He leads, you follow.  You will never find the bottom of God's creative box.  Take care to put Him first tho.  I know where I get in trouble is trying to fit God into my ideas, instead of going to Him first for the ideas.  I am EVER amazed by God's creativity and many times shocked (pleasantly) by the images that emerge. 

We need more artists that aren't afraid to create OUTSIDE that 'christian' box!!!  Girl, draw what God's put on your heart and don't apologize or ask permission from anyone else to do it! ~ Blessings ~

Oh great idea, thanks yes that has helped!

R.M.C. Haynes said:

Personally, I don't see a problem with using vampires or werewolves or even zombies allegorically (not particularly my preferred genre, but I don't have a problem with them really). Monsters in secular fiction tend to represent aspects of human nature or the human condition, so why not just put a Christian spin on it? I see it as more about the portrayal than the archetype. Mermaids have ties to pagan legends and even the occult, but I wouldn't exactly call Ariel a tool of Satan.

Though the undead are traditionally associated with the occult, lust, and numerous other taboos in Christianity, as you've said there's the potential to draw parallels between the lifting of a monster's curse and the spiritual transformation that comes about when one is born again. This might work especially well for vampires as it's easier to make the connection between a dead character and a dead or not-yet-quickened spirit. And personally, I don't see why they would necessarily have to be the villain. Though darker, the allegory could work the other way, portraying the vampire in a way that exemplifies being dead to sin and having new life in Christ (i.e. maybe the flaws of his human side are in fact the problem, like the flesh, and what he's turning into more closely models the spiritual man). If it's merely the occult element of it all that's the issue, then there is of course an easy work-around: just take a page from Marvel's Morbius: The Living Vampire or virtually every zombie franchise that's out there, changing the origin of the character's affliction from the supernatural (a curse, a potion) to science fiction (a viral or bacterial plague, being taken over by an alien organism).

Those are just my thoughts. Hope they're of some value!

I think its fine. 

I think an important issue to address (for any previously mortal, now immortal creature) like vampires would be that they can't die of natural causes, and after the Fall in the garden of Eden our bodies were designed to NOT live forever. So it would just be harder to explain a good guy vampire. 

As for violence - here's my stance on that. I have a lot of violence in my Rust Angel series - people get shot, hacked apart, and beaten up pretty good. The fact is that A) the bible is full of violent situations, and B) violence is often a good metaphor for internal struggle as well. Jesus said if an arm causes you to sin, cut it off. Now I'm not advocating that, but it paints a pretty vivid picture. Sin is a violent separation between us and God. The clashing of completely different viewpoints can often only result in violence. 

And above all, I think it'd be cool. And whats the point of a comic if its not cool?

Buzz, very true, my pastor was just meaning that if you can't find a verse to back it up then it's probably not a good idea.

Buzz Dixon said:

re "if it isn't in the Bible then don't do it":  Prophets like Nathan and even Christ himself used fictional stories to convey real truths.  I don't think there's a problem if you make it clear what you're portraying is meant as imaginative fiction, not as a primer on the supernatural.

Matt:  Exactly my point! Also, I was talking with my husband on his comic, he said it's not really christian oriented or was he trying to get anything across ( my assumption) but that it's good vs bad werewolves, which led me to rewriting a story I've been working on in my spare time as a hobby for a few months. I'll be posting a few concept art character pages here soon. Hint: Lion Vs Wolf....

Matt Tirre said:

...

"And above all, I think it'd be cool. And whats the point of a comic if its not cool?"

"The Guardians of Avalon" instead.

Christina Cheek said:

Matt:  Exactly my point! Also, I was talking with my husband on his comic, he said it's not really christian oriented or was he trying to get anything across ( my assumption) but that it's good vs bad werewolves, which led me to rewriting a story I've been working on in my spare time as a hobby for a few months. I'll be posting a few concept art character pages here soon. Hint: Lion Vs Wolf....

Matt Tirre said:

...

"And above all, I think it'd be cool. And whats the point of a comic if its not cool?"

RSS

Welcome to the Christian Comic Arts Society (CCAS) Online Network!

Did you know that CCAS has monthly meetings in the Los Angeles area? Contact Eric Jansen for more info!

 

Also, members of CCAS have produced the APAzine ALPHA-OMEGA for over 25 years!  We have about five openings right now!  Contact Eric Jansen for more info!  (This is a 30-member active-participation-only photocopied magazine for Christian writers and artists who submit a "trib" every other month for fun, fellowship, and critiques by other members.  Between postage and your photocopying costs, you might pay anywhere from $5 to $25 per issue.)

© 2019   Created by CCAS Web Admin.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service