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Or would it be too boring for readers? What if you could make it fun, making stories that go around it? To prove God exists and that there is no doubt about it? Maybe having some athiest characters question God's existiance and then through research the Christain characters show the athiests proof of God that they would have a hard time denying?

 

I think it would also make Christian comics more intelligent and possibly be taken more seriously like many graphic novels today.

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I would be the one doing all the drawing. Though if I could find people to work with me, that would be great so that way the comics come out faster. Not sure about doing in color since I am more into black and white but some fans of mine say that the comic in color would be better. I do have plans, such as doing more research and brainstorming ideas about how to make a plot around all those things.

Christopher Haupt said:
Hmmm.... Hey David. Yo. How would you go about getting the comic done? Meaning who would you get to draw it? Color it? How would you get it produced? And get it into the market? Do you have a plan? Have you been working on it? Or has it been on the back burner? Let me know? This was an old discussion but I'm curious?
Funny for a long time I though of doing that. My first idea in my head was about this girl going about and finding truth. Its kind of creative. Pretty much the subject of apolgetics certainly could cover it that way.

I think B.C. has been doing this forever.

There's a couple different approaches to this. It depends on if you're doing it in the context of a story, or an educational presentation, or an evangelistic tract.

 

One way is to tell a story and have the apologetics material included as part of the character interaction. This is hard to do well, as having talking heads preach to each other tends to feel... well... preachy, regardless of what topic the author is soapboxing on, and tends to stop the story dead in its tracks. (Bob Luedke's "Eyewitness" series is one of the rare ones to do this well; by setting a story within a historical adventure framework, it is able to communicate historical apologetics material without interrupting the flow of the story.)  Another format that might work for this is biographical comics telling stories from the lives of real Christians and showing what changed their minds and brought them to faith. If the story is about a character coming to faith, then the arguments/challenges that bring him to that point can be made relevant to the story and not just be an author's soapbox preaching at the reader.

 

In contrast to the "show don't tell" rule of fiction, the educational comic approach doesn't attempt wrap itself in a story and doesn't need to. It simply presents itself as educational non-fiction, presenting facts in an illustrated comics format. The Intervarsity Press comic book series "Doctor Doctrine's Christian Comix" by Dr. Fred Sanders was a very good example of this. (Non-Christian examples of educational non-fiction comics include the "Cartoon History of the Universe" by

 

 

Hi David,

How is this project going? I tried to do something like this. The result was not publishable, but I put it up on the internet. http://TheEdgeoftheFlock.com if you are curious how someone else tried to do what you are considering. I had(have) no writing background and my drawing is strictly amateur, I must warn you.

I'd love to hear more about your project! Here are some thoughts I had as I read your posts.

Don't make the mistake of making the unbelievers so 'evil' that they are unlikable. If the reader can't step into the shoes of the unbeliever, they won't follow them through the ego crushing process of repentance and submitting to God.

Did you ever listen to Focus on the Family's 'Adventures in Odyssey'? The early stories involving a pre-Christian Connie Kendall made us care about the character, up to, and in my case through the Salvation process in episodes "Connie: Part I" and "Connie: Part II". I know it's a radio drama and not a comic, but it kind of makes me think 'Christian Talking heads' -can- work, but probably are harder to pull off then other kinds of books...what do you think?

Part of my idea was to make a supporting cast of unbelievers coming from different backgrounds (Occultist/ Atheist/ Cultural 'Christian') so that many kinds of topics and issues could come up. I think if you decide to go with a graphic novel or mini-series this might work better than having random unbelievers engage the protagonist?

In the end, I think what you should aim at is catching the interest of the reader for the Bible and learning more about Christianity. While I know many folk were walked through apologetics to embrace Jesus Christ, many accept Him for other reasons too, especially over emotional and spiritual beliefs. No comic can ever replace the Bible, so it's rather freeing that you don't really have to try, but rather support the Gospel and point to the source:)

Anyways, I am hoping your project prospers! I don't have any pro-level skills, but if I can help in any way, let me know!

Merry Christmas!

God bless you and yours,

Gerry Lee

Hi Gerard. Well I am pretty behind in my work. But I have seen your work on Cyberlight and thought it was pretty interesting. I haven't listened to Focus On The Family in some time. And I will be careful on making unbelievers very evil. Thanks for the ideas! :)
 
Gerard Lee said:

Hi David,

How is this project going? I tried to do something like this. The result was not publishable, but I put it up on the internet. http://TheEdgeoftheFlock.com if you are curious how someone else tried to do what you are considering. I had(have) no writing background and my drawing is strictly amateur, I must warn you.

I'd love to hear more about your project! Here are some thoughts I had as I read your posts.

Don't make the mistake of making the unbelievers so 'evil' that they are unlikable. If the reader can't step into the shoes of the unbeliever, they won't follow them through the ego crushing process of repentance and submitting to God.

Did you ever listen to Focus on the Family's 'Adventures in Odyssey'? The early stories involving a pre-Christian Connie Kendall made us care about the character, up to, and in my case through the Salvation process in episodes "Connie: Part I" and "Connie: Part II". I know it's a radio drama and not a comic, but it kind of makes me think 'Christian Talking heads' -can- work, but probably are harder to pull off then other kinds of books...what do you think?

Part of my idea was to make a supporting cast of unbelievers coming from different backgrounds (Occultist/ Atheist/ Cultural 'Christian') so that many kinds of topics and issues could come up. I think if you decide to go with a graphic novel or mini-series this might work better than having random unbelievers engage the protagonist?

In the end, I think what you should aim at is catching the interest of the reader for the Bible and learning more about Christianity. While I know many folk were walked through apologetics to embrace Jesus Christ, many accept Him for other reasons too, especially over emotional and spiritual beliefs. No comic can ever replace the Bible, so it's rather freeing that you don't really have to try, but rather support the Gospel and point to the source:)

Anyways, I am hoping your project prospers! I don't have any pro-level skills, but if I can help in any way, let me know!

Merry Christmas!

God bless you and yours,

Gerry Lee

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